The Oxford History Of The Laws Of England 1483 1558

Author: John Hamilton Baker
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 0198258178
Size: 58.75 MB
Format: PDF
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'There can be no doubt that this series will stand as an enduring testament to the sheer fecundity of the contemporary study of English legal history.' -Law Quarterly Review'Despite the mass of scholarship shoe-horned into its pages, great care has been taken that this volume should be reasonably accessible to non-specialists and it is... an excellent volume.' -Law Quarterly ReviewThis, the first volume to appear in the landmark new Oxford History of the Laws of England series, covers the years 1483 - 1558, a period of immense social, political, and intellectual change, which profoundly affected the law and its workings.Readership: Libraries and scholars, some practitioners (changes detailed in this volume are fundamental to an understanding of the common law), historians interested in the early Tudor period, legal historians.

The Common Law In Colonial America

Author: William E. Nelson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199886857
Size: 35.89 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Drawing on groundbreaking and overwhelmingly extensive research into local court records, The Common Law in Colonial America proposes a "new beginning" in the study of colonial legal history, as it charts the course of the common law in Early America, to reveal how the models of law that emerged differed drastically from that of the English common law. In this first volume, Nelson explores how the law of the Chesapeake colonies--Virginia and Maryland--differed from the New England colonies--Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, New Haven, Plymouth, and Rhode Island--and looks at the differences between the colonial legal systems within the two regions, from their initial settlement until approximately 1660.

Imprisoning Medieval Women

Author: Dr Gwen Seabourne
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409482324
Size: 36.28 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The non-judicial confinement of women is a common event in medieval European literature and hagiography. The literary image of the imprisoned woman, usually a noblewoman, has carried through into the quasi-medieval world of the fairy and folk tale, in which the 'maiden in the tower' is one of the archetypes. Yet the confinement of women outside of the judicial system was not simply a fiction in the medieval period. Men too were imprisoned without trial and sometimes on mere suspicion of an offence, yet evidence suggests that there were important differences in the circumstances under which men and women were incarcerated, and in their roles in relation to non-judicial captivity. This study of the confinement of women highlights the disparity in regulation concerning male and female imprisonment in the middle ages, and gives a useful perspective on the nature of medieval law, its scope and limitations, and its interaction with royal power and prerogative. Looking at England from 1170 to 1509, the book discusses: the situations in which women might be imprisoned without formal accusation of trial; how social status, national allegiance and stage of life affected the chances of imprisonment; the relevant legal rules and norms; the extent to which legal and constitutional developments in medieval England affected women's amenability to confinement; what can be known of the experiences of women so incarcerated; and how women were involved in situations of non-judicial imprisonment, aside from themselves being prisoners.

The Language Of Law And The Foundations Of American Constitutionalism

Author: Gary L. McDowell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521140919
Size: 71.44 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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"In this fine book, Gary McDowell shows that the Constitution is our fundamental law---not our master, but our guide and mentor. Only at our peril do we try to make it our servant."---Harvey Mansfield, Harvard University "Erudite and lucid: McDowell's book is a must-read for those who wish to understand the philosophical and linguistic roots of the originalist tradition of constitutional interpretation."-R. Kent Newmyer, University of Connecticut School of Law "This book adds a major dimension of depth to the case for guiding judicial interpretation of the Constitution by the original intent of the framers. McDowell articulates a deeply thought-provoking meditation, informed by a fertile understanding of key foundations for originalism articulated by major figures in political philosophy, in the common law, and among the Founders themselves who shaped the theorizing that informs our constitutional order."---Thomas Pangle, University of Texas at Austin "For several decades, Gary McDowell has been one of our most brilliant and learned students of law and political philosophy. This book is his summa, a profound defense of originalism as a moral Constitutional philosophy, a brilliant discourse on the framers and their philosophical forbears and successors, and a powerful handbook of strategy in what McDowell calls `the contemporary war for the Constitution.'This work is essential reading for anyone who cares about the Supreme Court and the Constitution, but it is more. It is, simply stated, one of this generation's most important contributions toward preserving the rule of law itself."---Stephen Presser, Northwestern University School of Law "In this timely book, the case against the so-called `living' constitution is so powerfully argued and so clearly presented that it cannot be ignored."---Gordon S. Wood, Brown University

The Oxford History Of The Laws Of England

Author: John Hamilton Baker
Publisher:
ISBN:
Size: 34.45 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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"The Oxford History of the Laws of England" provides a detailed survey of the development of English law and its institutions from the earliest times until the twentieth century, drawing heavily upon recent research using unpublished materials.

Foucault S Monsters And The Challenge Of Law

Author: Alex Neville Sharpe
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135182655
Size: 19.16 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book considers the legal category 'monster' from theoretical and historical perspectives and deploys this category in order to understand contemporary anxieties surrounding transsexuals, conjoined twins and transgenic humans.

The Contracts Of Fiction

Author: Ellen Spolsky
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190232145
Size: 57.40 MB
Format: PDF
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The Contracts of Fiction reconnects our fictional worlds to the rest of our lives. Countering the contemporary tendency to dismiss works of imagination as enjoyable but epistemologically inert, the book considers how various kinds of fictions construct, guide, and challenge institutional relationships within social groups. The contracts of fiction, like the contracts of language, law, kinship, and money, describe the rules by which members of a group toggle between tokens and types, between their material surroundings - the stuff of daily life - and the abstractions that give it value. Rethinking some familiar literary concepts such as genre and style from the perspective of recent work in the biological, cognitive, and brain sciences, the book displays how fictions engage bodies and minds in ways that help societies balance continuity and adaptability. Being part of a community means sharing the ways its members use stories, pictures, plays and movies, poems and songs, icons and relics, to generate usable knowledge about the people, objects, beliefs and values in their environment. Exposing the underlying structural and processing homologies among works of imagination and life processes such as metabolism and memory, Ellen Spolsky demonstrates the seamless connection of life to art by revealing the surprising dependence of both on disorder, imbalance, and uncertainty. In early modern London, for example, reformed religion, expanding trade, and changed demographics made the obsolescent courts a source of serious inequities. Just at that time, however, a flood of wildly popular revenge tragedies, such as Hamlet, by their very form, by their outrageous theatrical grotesques, were shouting the need for change in the justice system. A sustained discussion of the genre illustrates how biological homeostasis underpins the social balance that we maintain with difficulty, and how disorder itself incubates new understanding.