Constitutional Law And American Democracy

Author: Corey Brettschneider
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law and Business
ISBN: 9780735579828
Size: 12.49 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5084
Download Read Online
In what promises to become a foundational undergraduate and law school text, Constitutional Law and American Democracy: Cases and Readings goes beyond parsing cases, providing ample

Governmental Powers

Author: Corey Brettschneider
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 0735579849
Size: 13.41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
View: 6059
Download Read Online
Governmental Powers: Cases and Readings in Constitutional Law and American Democracy, written by prominent scholar and professor of constitutional law and political theory, Corey Brettschneider, explores the division, enumeration, and roles of the governmental powers established under the U.S. Constitution and the controversies arising from that system in the context of a changing American society. Like its parent volume, Constitutional Law and American Democracy, this text offers a wealth of highly focused case excerpts and interdisciplinary readings dealing with today s most salient debates. These carefully selected readings and cases focus on high-interest topics, including the nature and justification of judicial review, federalism, and separation of powers, and work together to create a nuanced view of key political and constitutional issues. Grounded in precedent, constitutional theory, and history, this bold work explores urgent issues of current debate and controversy making Governmental Powers fun to read and to teach. The clear, well-reasoned writing frequently challenges and always engages. A dynamic book drawing on a wealth of sources, Governmental Powers: Cases and Readings in Constitutional Law and American Democracy, features: An organization linking the history of the Constitution, constitutional law, and the structure of the federal government to contemporary issues and controversies A wealth of primary sources, including case excerpts, concurring and dissenting opinions, law journal and interdisciplinary articles, and published letters A new chapter on the nature and implications of the Supreme Court s 2012 decision regarding the Patient Protection and Affordable Health Care Act A focused selection of cases conveying a nuanced perspective on the Constitution and the political and constitutional disputes that have shaped its meaning Exposure to legal argumentation through astutely selected and edited readings from noted scholars and theorists Coverage spanning the history and development of constitutional law up to the present day, with ample background for considering the big-picture questions of constitutional doctrine and the Supreme Court s role A stimulating balance of foundational and cutting-edge topical coverage that doesn t sidestep provocative or controversial subject matter Overviews in each chapter introducing the constitutional arguments, chapter readings, and cases Discussion questions promoting comprehension, analysis, and classroom discourse Teachers of constitutional law have long awaited a text like this. Brettschneider blends the most important pertinent statements of political and legal theory with skillful excerpts from the major constitutional cases on governmental powers, civil rights, and civil liberties. Brettschneider s insightful commentaries make the text all the richer. Rogers M. Smith, Christopher H. Browne Distinguished Professor of Political Science, University of Pennsylvania

Civil Rights And Liberties

Author: Corey L. Brettschneider
Publisher: Wolters Kluwer Law & Business
ISBN: 1454819243
Size: 65.38 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 821
Download Read Online
An engaging conceptualizing chapter opens Civil Rights and Liberties: Cases and Readings in Constitutional Law and American Democracy, introducing civil liberties within their constitutional framework, illuminating their nature and sources through enlightening Supreme Court deliberations that show the underlying debates about constitutional interpretation. A distinctive approach to themes and principles encourages students to develop their own views on civil liberties in general and on the specific controversies such as abortion, gay rights, and hate speech. Extensive, intriguing excerpts from a highly focused set of cases and other readings from contemporary theory highlight conflicting opinions among the justices. They provide depth of understanding of the Constitution and of the disputes that have shaped its meaning, including the basis and nature of judicial authority. The text's thematic organization reveals the structural and normative features of the Constitution and constitutional law by linking them to contemporary issues and controversies. Key historical elements lend context and depth. A logical chapter structure offers probing overviews of the topics, constitutional arguments, and chapter readings followed by a broad range of theoretical and historical writings leading up to the cases. This multidimensional perspective draws on a wide array of resources such as case excerpts, concurring and dissenting opinions, law journal and articles, general publications, published letters, and other documents. Probing case comprehension, discussion, and synthesis questions punctuate and reinforce content. Features: an engaging conceptualizing opening chapter introduces civil liberties within constitutional framework illuminates their nature and sources through enlightening Supreme Court disputes shows underlying debates about constitutional interpretation a distinctive approach to themes and principles encourages students to develop their own views on civil liberties engages students in specific controversies--abortion, gay rights, and hate speech, etc. intriguing excerpts from a highly focused set of cases and other readings highlight disputes among the justices provide depth of understanding of the Constitution and interpretive disputes explore the basis and nature of judicial authority thematic organization shows structural and normative features of the Constitution and constitutional law links the Constitution to contemporary issues and controversies provides key historical elements for context logical chapter structure author's overviews of topics, constitutional arguments, and chapter readings a broad range of theoretical and historical writings key cases a multidimensional perspective draws on a wide array of resources case excerpts concurring and dissenting opinions law journal articles general publications published letters and other documents probing case comprehension, discussion, and synthesis questions reinforce content

Unfit For Democracy

Author: Stephen Gottlieb
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814732429
Size: 41.12 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 3922
Download Read Online
Asked if the country was governed by a republic or a monarchy, Benjamin Franklin replied, “A republic, if you can keep it.” Since its founding, Americans have worked hard to nurture and protect their hard-won democracy. And yet few consider the role of constitutional law in America’s survival. In Unfit for Democracy, Stephen Gottlieb argues that constitutional law without a focus on the future of democratic government is incoherent—illogical and contradictory. Approaching the decisions of the Roberts Court from political science, historical, comparative, and legal perspectives, Gottlieb highlights the dangers the court presents by neglecting to interpret the law with an eye towards preserving democracy. A senior scholar of constitutional law, Gottlieb brings a pioneering will to his theoretical and comparative criticism of the Roberts Court. The Roberts Court decisions are not examined in a vacuum but instead viewed in light of constitutional politics in India, South Africa, emerging Eastern European nations, and others. While constitutional decisions abroad have contributed to both the breakdown and strengthening of democratic politics, decisions in the Roberts Court have aggravated the potential destabilizing factors in democratic governments. Ultimately, Unfit for Democracy calls for an interpretation of the Constitution that takes the future of democracy seriously. Gottlieb warns that the Roberts Court’s decisions have hurt ordinary Americans economically, politically, and in the criminal process. They have damaged the historic American melting pot, increased the risk of anti-democratic paramilitaries, and clouded the democratic future.

Madison S Nightmare

Author: Peter M. Shane
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226749428
Size: 18.24 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 6447
Download Read Online
The George W. Bush administration’s ambitious—even breathtaking—claims of unilateral executive authority raised deep concerns among constitutional scholars, civil libertarians, and ordinary citizens alike. But Bush’s attempts to assert his power are only the culmination of a near-thirty-year assault on the basic checks and balances of the U.S. government—a battle waged by presidents of both parties, and one that, as Peter M. Shane warns in Madison’s Nightmare, threatens to utterly subvert the founders’ vision of representative government. Tracing this tendency back to the first Reagan administration, Shane shows how this era of "aggressive presidentialism" has seen presidents exerting ever more control over nearly every arena of policy, from military affairs and national security to domestic programs. Driven by political ambition and a growing culture of entitlement in the executive branch—and abetted by a complaisant Congress, riven by partisanship—this presidential aggrandizement has too often undermined wise policy making and led to shallow, ideological, and sometimes outright lawless decisions. The solution, Shane argues, will require a multipronged program of reform, including both specific changes in government practice and broader institutional changes aimed at supporting a renewed culture of government accountability. From the war on science to the mismanaged war on terror, Madison’s Nightmare outlines the disastrous consequences of the unchecked executive—and issues a stern wake-up call to all who care about the fate of our long democratic experiment.

Our Secret Constitution

Author: George P. Fletcher
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780198032434
Size: 56.60 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5319
Download Read Online
Americans hate and distrust their government. At the same time, Americans love and trust their government. These contradictory attitudes are resolved by Fletcher's novel interpretation of constitutional history. He argues that we have two constitutions--still living side by side--one that caters to freedom and fear, the other that satisfied our needs for security and social justice. The first constitution came into force in 1789. It stresses freedom, voluntary association, and republican elitism. The second constitution begins with the Gettysburg Address and emphasizes equality, organic nationhood, and popular democracy. These radical differences between our two constitutions explain our ambivalence and self-contradictory attitudes toward government. With September 11 the second constitution--which Fletcher calls the Secret Constitution--has become ascendant. When America is under threat, the nation cultivates its solidarity. It overcomes its fear and looks to government for protection and the pursuit of social justice. Lincoln's messages of a strong government and a nation that must "long endure" have never been more relevant to American politics. "Fletcher's argument has intriguing implications beyond the sweeping subject of this profoundly thought-provoking book."--The Denver Post

Capitalism V Democracy

Author: Timothy K. Kuhner
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804791589
Size: 66.31 MB
Format: PDF
View: 6035
Download Read Online
As of the latest national elections, it costs approximately $1 billion to become president, $10 million to become a Senator, and $1 million to become a Member of the House. High-priced campaigns, an elite class of donors and spenders, superPACs, and increasing corporate political power have become the new normal in American politics. In Capitalism v. Democracy, Timothy Kuhner explains how these conditions have corrupted American democracy, turning it into a system of rule that favors the wealthy and marginalizes ordinary citizens. Kuhner maintains that these conditions have corrupted capitalism as well, routing economic competition through political channels and allowing politically powerful companies to evade market forces. The Supreme Court has brought about both forms of corruption by striking down campaign finance reforms that limited the role of money in politics. Exposing the extreme economic worldview that pollutes constitutional interpretation, Kuhner shows how the Court became the architect of American plutocracy. Capitalism v. Democracy offers the key to understanding why corporations are now citizens, money is political speech, limits on corporate spending are a form of censorship, democracy is a free market, and political equality and democratic integrity are unconstitutional constraints on money in politics. Supreme Court opinions have dictated these conditions in the name of the Constitution, as though the Constitution itself required the privatization of democracy. Kuhner explores the reasons behind these opinions, reveals that they form a blueprint for free market democracy, and demonstrates that this design corrupts both politics and markets. He argues that nothing short of a constitutional amendment can set the necessary boundaries between capitalism and democracy.

Democracy And Distrust

Author: John Hart Ely
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674196377
Size: 55.18 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
View: 5923
Download Read Online
Until now legal experts have proposed two basic approaches to the Constitution. The first, "interpretivism," maintains that we should stick as closely as possible to what is explicit in the document itself. The second, predominant in recent academic theorizing, argues that the courts should be guided by what they see as the fundamental values of American society. Mr. Ely demonstrates that both of these approaches are inherently incomplete and inadequate. --from publisher description.

Law Pragmatism And Democracy

Author: Richard A. Posner
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674042292
Size: 69.35 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 1771
Download Read Online
Richard Posner argues for a conception of the liberal state based on pragmatic theories of government. He views the actions of elected officials as guided by interests rather than by reason and the decisions of judges by discretion rather than by rules. He emphasizes the institutional and material, rather than moral and deliberative, factors in democratic decision making. Posner argues that democracy is best viewed as a competition for power by means of regular elections. Citizens should not be expected to play a significant role in making complex public policy regarding, say, taxes or missile defense.