American Justice 2016

Author: Lincoln Caplan
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812248902
Size: 59.65 MB
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When the Democrat-appointed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg criticized Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump, she triggered concerns about judicial ethics. But the political concerns were even more serious. The Supreme Court is supposed to be what Alexander Hamilton called "the least dangerous" branch of government, because it is the least political. Justices have lifetime appointments to ensure their "complete independence" when deciding cases and controversies. But in the Roberts Court's most contested and important rulings, it has divided along partisan lines for the first time in American history: Republican presidents appointed the conservatives, Democrats appointed the liberals. Justice Ginsburg's criticisms suggested that partisan politics drive the Court's most profound disagreements. Well-respected political science supports that view. Has this partisan turn made the Court less independent and less trustworthy than the nation requires? The term ending in 2016 included more decisions and developments in almost fifty years for analyzing this question. Among them were major cases about abortion rights, the death penalty, immigration, and other wedge issues, as well as the death of Justice Antonin G. Scalia, leaving the Court evenly divided between conservatives and liberals. Legal journalist Lincoln Caplan dissects the recent term, puts it in historical context, and recommends ways to strengthen trust in the Supreme Court as the pinnacle of the American constitutional system.

Cold War Ruins

Author: Lisa Yoneyama
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822374110
Size: 59.26 MB
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In Cold War Ruins Lisa Yoneyama argues that the efforts intensifying since the 1990s to bring justice to the victims of Japanese military and colonial violence have generated what she calls a "transborder redress culture." A product of failed post-World War II transitional justice that left many colonial legacies intact, this culture both contests and reiterates the complex transwar and transpacific entanglements that have sustained the Cold War unredressability and illegibility of certain violences. By linking justice to the effects of American geopolitical hegemony, and by deploying a conjunctive cultural critique—of "comfort women" redress efforts, state-sponsored apologies and amnesties, Asian American involvement in redress cases, the ongoing effects of the U.S. occupation of Japan and Okinawa, Japanese atrocities in China, and battles over WWII memories—Yoneyama helps illuminate how redress culture across Asia and the Pacific has the potential to bring powerful new and challenging perspectives on American exceptionalism, militarized security, justice, sovereignty, forgiveness, and decolonization.

American Justice

Author: Paul Brakke
Publisher: Touchpoint Press
ISBN: 9780692710685
Size: 40.42 MB
Format: PDF
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This book is for those who believe they know all they need to know about the criminal justice system - the system that keeps us safe from criminals; the system that protects its good, law-abiding citizens. Told in two sections, the first a first-person perspective of a victim's husband, American Justice is a true story that provides an up close and personal look at the American justice system and how easy it is to become a victim of the system. The focus within this book is more than the victims' stories - it is a crucial and critical examination of how things can go very wrong, especially when one does not adequately understand the laws that are supposed to protect them. Paul Brakke and his wife Carol believed that obeying the law and telling the truth was good enough. They believed that truth would indeed prevail. They were wrong. Paul and Carol Brakke's nightmare began when some local kids falsely accused Carol of trying to run one of them over. The kids didn't like her interfering with their play at a dangerous intersection. Based on this false accusation and additional lies by neighbors who wanted to get the Brakkes out of the neighborhood, Carol was subjected to psychological warfare, which included an involuntary commitment to a psych ward, two psychological evaluations, exile from her home, delays in setting a trial date, and the threat of a 16-year jail term. These circumstances forced the Brakkes to agree to move out of their home to another community as part of a plea bargain in which all charges relating to aggravated assault were dropped. This book describes Carol and Paul's harrowing experience, followed by Paul's discussion of problems in the criminal justice system and recommendations on what to do to resolve those problems. As the second section of this book points out, much can go wrong in legal cases. As such, it is vital to educate yourself about the U.S. criminal justice system to prevent becoming a victim and to improve the system to make ours a better country and a more just society.

American Justice 2015

Author: Steven V. Mazie
Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 0812248066
Size: 10.71 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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In a series of sharply written chapters, Steven Mazie lays out the issues and arguments at stake in the ten most polarising and controversial opinions of the term. The cases touch on such hot-button issues as free speech, race and equality, religious freedom, privacy, the fate of Obamacare, and gay marriage.

Snitching

Author: Alexandra Natapoff
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 9780814758588
Size: 59.80 MB
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Winner of the 2010 American Bar Association Honorable Mention for Books Albert Burrell spent thirteen years on death row for a murder he did not commit. Atlanta police killed 92-year-old Kathryn Johnston during a misguided raid on her home. After being released by Chicago prosecutors, Darryl Moore—drug dealer, hit man, and rapist—returned home to rape an eleven-year-old girl. Such tragedies are consequences of snitching—police and prosecutors offering deals to criminal offenders in exchange for information. Although it is nearly invisible to the public, criminal snitching has invaded the American legal system in risky and sometimes shocking ways. Snitching is the first comprehensive analysis of this powerful and problematic practice, in which informant deals generate unreliable evidence, allow criminals to escape punishment, endanger the innocent, compromise the integrity of police work, and exacerbate tension between police and poor urban residents. Driven by dozens of real-life stories and debacles, the book exposes the social destruction that snitching can cause in high-crime African American neighborhoods, and how using criminal informants renders our entire penal process more secretive and less fair. Natapoff also uncovers the farreaching legal, political, and cultural significance of snitching: from the war on drugs to hip hop music, from the FBI’s mishandling of its murderous mafia informants to the new surge in white collar and terrorism informing. She explains how existing law functions and proposes new reforms. By delving into the secretive world of criminal informants, Snitching reveals deep and often disturbing truths about the way American justice really works.

The American System Of Criminal Justice

Author: George F. Cole
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1305886917
Size: 66.99 MB
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This classic best seller, commonly referred to as The Eagle, helps students discover the challenges of pursuing justice in our society and identify the roles individuals play in the criminal justice system. Using an interdisciplinary lens, THE AMERICAN SYSTEM OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE, 15th Edition, presents elements from criminology, sociology, law, history, psychology, and political science. This approach challenges students to ask important questions and recognize contemporary problems as the means to build their understanding of the system's components and stages as well as its human consequences and policy challenges. The text offers a comprehensive introduction to the field with solid scholarship and approachable writing, and holds student attention with current, compelling events and cases. The combination of these elements helps prepare students to participate in the system as citizens and future criminal justice practitioners. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

American Justice On Trial

Author: Lise Pearlman
Publisher:
ISBN: 9781587903694
Size: 45.65 MB
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Pearlman's new book American Justice on Trial: People v. Newton compares the explosive state of American race relations in 1968 to race relations today with insights from key participants and observers of the Oakland, California death-penalty trial of Huey Newton for murder that launched the Black Panther Party and transformed the American jury.

Police Interrogation And American Justice

Author: Richard A Leo
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674035313
Size: 32.63 MB
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Read him his rights. We all recognize this line from cop dramas. But what happens afterward? In this book, Leo sheds light on a little-known corner of our criminal justice system--the police interrogation. An important study of the criminal justice system, this book provides interesting answers and raises some unsettling questions.

American Justice In Taiwan

Author: Stephen G. Craft
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813166365
Size: 41.81 MB
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On May 23, 1957, US Army Sergeant Robert Reynolds was acquitted of murdering Chinese officer Liu Ziran in Taiwan. Reynolds did not deny shooting Liu but claimed self-defense and, like all members of US military assistance and advisory groups, was protected under diplomatic immunity. Reynolds's acquittal sparked a series of riots across Taiwan that became an international crisis for the Eisenhower administration and raised serious questions about the legal status of US military forces positioned around the world. In American Justice in Taiwan, author Stephen G. Craft provides the first comprehensive study of the causes and consequences of the Reynolds trial and the ensuing protests. After more than a century of what they perceived as unfair treaties imposed by Western nations, the Taiwanese regarded the special legal status of resident American personnel with extreme distrust. While Eisenhower and his advisers considered Taiwan to be a vital ally against Chinese communism, the US believed that the Taiwanese government had instigated the unrest in order to protest the verdict and demand legal jurisdiction over GIs. Regardless, the events that transpired in 1957 exposed the enormous difficulty of applying the US's Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) across cultures. Employing meticulous research from both Western and Chinese archives, Craft demonstrates that the riots were only anti-American in that the Taiwanese rejected the UCMJ, the affording of diplomatic immunity to occupying US forces, and the military courts' interpretation of self-defense. His compelling study provides a new lens through which to examine US--Taiwan relations in the 1950s, US policy in Asia, and the incredibly charged and complex question of the legal status of US troops on foreign soil.

Transitional Justice In Latin America

Author: Elin Skaar
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 9781138853249
Size: 31.14 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book addresses current developments in transitional justice in Latin America effectively the first region to undergo concentrated transitional justice experiences in modern times. Using a comparative approach, it examines trajectories in truth, justice, reparations, and amnesties in countries emerging from periods of massive violations of human rights and humanitarian law. The book examines the cases of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, El Salvador, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay, developing and applying a common analytical framework to provide a systematic, qualitative and comparative analysis of their transitional justice experiences. More specifically, the book investigates to what extent there has been a shift from impunity towards accountability for past human rights violations in Latin America. Using thick, but structured, narratives which allow patterns to emerge, rather than being imposed the book assesses how the quality, timing and sequencing of transitional justice mechanisms, along with the context in which they appear, have mattered for the nature and impact of transitional justice processes in the region. Offering a new approach to assessing transitional justice, and challenging many assumptions in the established literature, this book will be of enormous benefit to scholars and others working in this area."